Calculation of FCR and RBC with Varied Effect of Iron in Broiler
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 3, Issue 6-1, November 2014, Pages: 46-51
Received: Aug. 20, 2014; Accepted: Jan. 29, 2015; Published: Mar. 18, 2015
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Authors
Barkat Ali Kalwar, Department of Nutrition and Animal Product Technology, Faculty of AHV, Science, SAU, Tandojam- Sindh
Hakim Ali Sahito, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, SALU- Khairpur- Sindh
Mehmood Ahmed Kalwar, Department of Nutrition and Animal Product Technology, Faculty of AHV, Science, SAU, Tandojam- Sindh
Zaibun Nisa Memon, Department of Zoology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, SALU- Khairpur- Sindh
Madan Lal, Department of Nutrition and Animal Product Technology, Faculty of AHV, Science, SAU, Tandojam- Sindh
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Abstract
One hundred and fifty hubbard broiler were studied to examine their response to various levels of iron in relation to FCR and blood parameters. The experiment was conducted at poultry experimental station, Faculty of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Sciences, Sindh Agriculture University Tandojam during, 2013. Commercial feed was supplemented with iron concentration of 0 (Control), 40, 80, 120, 160mg/kg in groups A, B, C, D and E, respectively. Result revealed lowest feed (3780g) and water (8160ml) consumed by group E. Better (P<0.05) live weight (1939g), FCR (1.94), dressing percentage (64.93%), RBC (3.33x106/µl), HB (9.30g/dL), PCV (31.1%) and Rs. 47.35 per bird net profit was also recorded in group E where, 160mg/ kg iron was supplemented in broiler ration. Lowest mortality (6.66%) was also observed in group E, while non-significant differences in edible parts were observed among the groups. Increasing level of iron showed better performance in the groups. It is concluded that 160mg/kg iron level can be supplemented in broiler ration for better FCR, dressing % and per bird net profit along with better performance in blood parameters.
Keywords
Ration, Red Blood Cells, Mortality, Profitand Poultry
To cite this article
Barkat Ali Kalwar, Hakim Ali Sahito, Mehmood Ahmed Kalwar, Zaibun Nisa Memon, Madan Lal, Calculation of FCR and RBC with Varied Effect of Iron in Broiler, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Special Issue: Agriculture Ecosystems and Environment. Vol. 3, No. 6-1, 2014, pp. 46-51. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.s.2014030601.17
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