Status of Pest, Oryctes rhinoceros and Its Natural Enemies in the Independent Smallholder Treated with Different Insecticides
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 8, Issue 4, August 2019, Pages: 89-94
Received: Jul. 28, 2019; Accepted: Aug. 19, 2019; Published: Sep. 17, 2019
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Authors
Fathul Nabila Abd Karim, Department of Entomology, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
Mohd Rasdi Zaini, Agricultural Entomology, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Jasin, Melaka, Malaysia
Ismail Rakibe, Department of Entomology, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
Shafiq Sani, Agronomy, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Jasin, Melaka, Malaysia
Nurul Farahana Hazira Hazlee, Department of Entomology, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
Noor Shuhaina Shaikh Mazran, Department of Entomology, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia
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Abstract
A field study was carried out at Tangkak, Malaysia regarding Oryctes rhinoceros’s infestation and its natural enemies after being treated with selected pesticides from January until October 2017. The objective of this study to examine the effect of different insecticides usages with the presences of Oryctes rhinoceros including unteated area and population of Oryctes’s natural enemy in the oil palm areas of smallholders. Three treatments with four replicates were applied in the selected oil palm area, namely Cypermethrin, Carbofuran and Untreated (without chemical). Twelve smallholders with three different insecticides used were chosen randomly and twelve samples were taken as replicates. Effects of the beetles’ population over the chemical’s treatments were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) (SPSS - version 23). The results dramatically revealed that the least presence of Oryctes rhinoceros was detected at Untreated area with total mean of 0.21, followed by Carbofuran with total mean of 2.63 and Cypermethrin with 3.12. The result of this study indicated that Oryctes rhinoceros in Tangkak, Johor has developed resistance to the insecticides used by the growers due to high frequency of similar type of chemical. These insecticides had no significant effect towards the natural enemy found in oil palm area in Tangkak which is Platymeris laevicollis. These natural enemies also showed no relationship directly with the presences of Oryctes rhinoceros due to low diversity of plant species or particularly lack of shelter.
Keywords
Insecticides, Oryctes Rhinoceros, Platymeris Laevicolli
To cite this article
Fathul Nabila Abd Karim, Mohd Rasdi Zaini, Ismail Rakibe, Shafiq Sani, Nurul Farahana Hazira Hazlee, Noor Shuhaina Shaikh Mazran, Status of Pest, Oryctes rhinoceros and Its Natural Enemies in the Independent Smallholder Treated with Different Insecticides, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 8, No. 4, 2019, pp. 89-94. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20190804.12
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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