Compatibility of Jatropha Curcas with Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cv. Obatampa in a Hedgerow Intercropping System Grown on Ferric Acrisols
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages: 109-116
Received: Apr. 5, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 26, 2015; Published: May 13, 2015
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Authors
Abugre S., Department of Forest Science, School of Natural Resources, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Sunyani, Ghana
Twum-Ampofo K., Department of Environmental Management, School of Natural Resources, University of Energy and Natural Resources, Sunyani, Ghana
Oti-Boateng C., Department of Agroforestry, Faculty of Renewable Natural Resources, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana
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Abstract
Skeptics are talking about the impact of the biofuel crop on food production. It is important that the compatibility of Jatropha curcas in agroforestry systems is investigated to provide answers to some of these problems being advanced. The Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with three hedgerow spacings of 2 m x 1 m, 3 m x 1m, 4 m x 1 m of Jatropha curcas and a control (No hedgerow) was used to lay out the experiment. This was replicated 3 times. The study showed that in the second year, plant height and plant diameter at first node differed significantly between the treatments. Maximum stover weight was 11.9 tons/ha and 7.5 tons/ha in the first and second year respectively for 4 m x 1 m spacing. Generally yields were lower in the second year in all the treatments compared to the first year. Maximum grain yield of maize was 4.47 tons/ha and 2.99 tons/ha in the first and second year respectively at the control treatment. Chemical properties of the soil did not record any significant decline after two years of cultivation. pH, organic Carbon, total nitrogen, organic matter, exchangeable cations, total exchangeable bases, exchangeable acid and base saturation did not show significant difference between the treatments. The highest Land Equivalent Ratio (LER) of 1.6 and 1.2 was recorded at 4 m x 1 m for both years, making it the most suitable plant spacing for Jatropha curcas with maize.
Keywords
Jatropha Curcas, Growth, Yield, Land Equivalent Ratio, Nutrient Status
To cite this article
Abugre S., Twum-Ampofo K., Oti-Boateng C., Compatibility of Jatropha Curcas with Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cv. Obatampa in a Hedgerow Intercropping System Grown on Ferric Acrisols, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2015, pp. 109-116. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150403.16
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