Effectiveness of Communication Strategies used in Creating Awareness and Uptake of Food Quality and Safety Standards in the Informal Market Outlets of Camel Suusa and Nyirinyiri
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 4, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages: 83-86
Received: Mar. 31, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 14, 2015; Published: Apr. 21, 2015
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Authors
Madete S. K. Pauline, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Bebe O. Bockline, Department of Animal Sciences, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Matofari W. Joseph, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
Muliro S. Patrick, Department of Dairy and Food Science and Technology, Egerton University, Nakuru, Kenya
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Abstract
The Nyirinyiri and Suusa products from camel meat and milk processed by pastoral women using indigenous knowledge and traded in the informal markets presents opportunities to enhance household food security and income and also health benefits to consumers. However, safety and quality concerns by consumers are market barriers, especially acceptability beyond the traditional camel eating communities and in urban niche markets. It is possible to break this market barrier with effective communication of the food safety and quality standards but there exist knowledge gaps on the extent to which use of seminars and trainings, media briefs, radios, television and manuals increase awareness and uptake of the food standards and benefits to actors in the informal food markets. This study therefore identified the effectiveness of communication strategies used in promoting awareness and uptake of food quality and safety standards in the informal market outlet. Survey, Focus Group Discussion and Participatory appraisal of actors along the value chain were the methods used in data collection. The results showed that communication strategies in place were meant for the formal market hence the camel Suusa and Nyirinyiri chain actors gave the perceived effectiveness of the communication strategies if they were to be for the informal market outlet for promote acceptance and access for Suusa and Nyirinyiri in the high value markets.
Keywords
Food Quality and Safety, Informal Markets, Communication, Consumer Concern
To cite this article
Madete S. K. Pauline, Bebe O. Bockline, Matofari W. Joseph, Muliro S. Patrick, Effectiveness of Communication Strategies used in Creating Awareness and Uptake of Food Quality and Safety Standards in the Informal Market Outlets of Camel Suusa and Nyirinyiri, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2015, pp. 83-86. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20150403.11
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