Comparison of Different Fertilizer Management Practices on Rice Growth and Yield in the Ashanti Region of Ghana
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 3, Issue 5, October 2014, Pages: 374-379
Received: Sep. 3, 2014; Accepted: Sep. 23, 2014; Published: Oct. 20, 2014
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Authors
Roland Nuhu Issaka, CSIR-Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Division, Soil Research Institute, Academy Post Office, Kwadaso, Ghana
Moro Mohammed Buri, CSIR-Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition Division, Soil Research Institute, Academy Post Office, Kwadaso, Ghana
Satoshi Nakamura, Crop Production and Environment Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences. Ohwashi, Tsukuba, 305-8686, Japan
Satoshi Tobita, Crop Production and Environment Division, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences. Ohwashi, Tsukuba, 305-8686, Japan
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Abstract
Nutrient management is critical in increasing and sustaining rice yield. A field experiment was conducted to examine the effects of inorganic fertilizer (IF), poultry manure (PM) and their combinations on rice yield and possible residual effects. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used and the trial was conducted on a Gleysol. In 2011 SPAD values for IF and PM/ IF combinations (except 2.0 t/ha PM + 22.5-15-15 kg N: P2O5: K2O/ha) were significantly higher in the sixth week onwards than PM. Number of panicles/plant and number of panicles m2 were significantly higher for 90-60-60 kg N: P2O5: K2O/ha and 2.0 t/ha PM + 22.5-15-15 kg N: P2O5: K2O/ha than 6.0 and 4.0 t/ha PM resulting in significantly higher grain yield. Grain yield of IF was similar to grain yield of PM/IF combinations. In 2012 the residual effects showed a significantly higher SPAD value for the 6.0 t/ha PM. Also 6.0 t/ha PM, 4.0 t/ha PM and 4.0 t/ha PM + 30 kg N/ha had significantly high number of panicles/plant and number of panicles/m2 than IF. Residual effect of PM applied at 4.0 t/ha and above gave significantly higher grain yield than IF. Mean grain yield for the three years showed that 4.0 t/ha PM + 30 kg N/ha and 2.0 t/ha PM + 22.5-15-15 kg N: P2O5: K2O/ha gave significantly higher yields than the other treatments. The results indicate that integrating IF and PM is a better option in increasing and sustaining rice production.
Keywords
Grain Yield, Inorganic Fertilizer, Poultry Manure, Rice
To cite this article
Roland Nuhu Issaka, Moro Mohammed Buri, Satoshi Nakamura, Satoshi Tobita, Comparison of Different Fertilizer Management Practices on Rice Growth and Yield in the Ashanti Region of Ghana, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2014, pp. 374-379. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20140305.17
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