Methane Emission on Intensive rice Farming with Water Frequency and Fertilizer Management in North Sumatera
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2014, Pages: 155-162
Received: May 13, 2014; Accepted: May 26, 2014; Published: May 30, 2014
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Authors
Khadijah EL Ramija, Study Program of Natural Resource and Environmental Management, Graduate School, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Maas, Medan, Indonesia; Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology (AIAT), North Sumatera, and the Indonesian Agency For Agricultural Research And Development (IAARD), Ministry Of Agriculture
Zulkifly Nasution, Study Program of Natural Resource and Environmental Management, Graduate School, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Maas, Medan, Indonesia; Departement of Agroecotechnolgy, Faculty of Agriculture University of Sumatera Utara, jln Prof A. Sofyan No 3, Medan Indonesia, 20155
M. Zarlis, Study Program of Natural Resource and Environmental Management, Graduate School, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Maas, Medan, Indonesia; Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathemathics and Natural Sciences, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Bioteknologi No. 1, Medan, Indonesia
Retno Widiastuti, Study Program of Natural Resource and Environmental Management, Graduate School, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Maas, Medan, Indonesia; Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathemathics and Natural Sciences, University of Sumatera Utara, Jln. Bioteknologi No. 1, Medan, Indonesia
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Abstract
Rice cultivation during four planting seasons by using cultivation system improvements, especially in the management provision of water and fertilizer, other than increasing rice production can also reduce methane emission which is often rumored as a cause of global warming. Efforts to reduce methane emission from paddy fields must be done because of the impact of ecological damage caused by climate change due to global warming. It is estimated that by the year 2100 the average surface temperature of the earth will increase up 2 to 3° C. The experiment was conducted in the village of Purbaganda, Pematang Bandar District, Simalungun over four planting seasons from July 2011 until June 2012. The research design used in the study was split plot design which was organized into groups based on the difficulty of obtaining an ideal environmental uniformity in the field. Watering System treatment as main plot factor (A) and fertilization as subplot factor (B), with three replications. The treatments in the main plot were intermittent and continuous irrigation system, conducted to determine the amount of methane emissions in each planting season. For subplot, the fertilization treatments were based on laboratory analysis of soil, and Fertilization Recommendation of the Minister of Agriculture regulation No. 40 OT.140/2007. These were then combined with probiotic fertilization. The results showed that the pattern of methane emission varies in each treatment. The average methane emission was highest in treatment A1B1 with 338.50 kg ha-1 per season, and lowest in A2B6 treatment with 63.25 kg ha-1 per season. A2B6 treatment that used fertilization according to laboratory analysis with probiotic fertilization experienced intermittent irrigation process. The higher dosage of fertilizer N in treatment A1B1 led to higher methane emission than treatment A2B6. N fertilizer in rice fields can increase methane emissions due to increased rice growth, which was the source of methane biomass that increased the emission lines. Interaction between flooding and fertilization treatments that gave the highest emission during the four planting seasons was A1B1 and the lowest was A2B6. Comparison between the interaction of A1B1 and A2B6 on methane emission results was significantly different (DMRT test, P = 0.05).
Keywords
Methane Emission, Intensive Rice Cultivation, Intermittent and Fertilization
To cite this article
Khadijah EL Ramija, Zulkifly Nasution, M. Zarlis, Retno Widiastuti, Methane Emission on Intensive rice Farming with Water Frequency and Fertilizer Management in North Sumatera, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2014, pp. 155-162. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20140303.13
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