Response to Fertilizer of Native Grasses (Pennisetum polystachion and Setaria Sphacelata) and Legume (Tephrosia pedicellata) of Savannah in Sudanian Benin
Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2014, Pages: 142-146
Received: Feb. 12, 2014; Accepted: May 17, 2014; Published: May 20, 2014
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Authors
KINDOMIHOU Missiakô Valentin, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Department of Natural Resources Management, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey Calavi, Benin Republic; Department of Animal Production, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey Calavi, Benin Republic
SAIDOU Aliou, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Department of Natural Resources Management, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey Calavi, Benin Republic; Department of Crop Production, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey Calavi, Benin Republic
SINSIN Brice Augustin, Laboratory of Applied Ecology, Department of Natural Resources Management, Faculty of Agronomic Sciences, University of Abomey-Calavi, Abomey Calavi, Benin Republic
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Abstract
Response to nitrogen fertilizer of 2 grass species, Pennisetum polystachion and Setaria sphacelata, and one legume Tephrosia pedicellata was studied in northern Benin. The 3 species are native in Sudanian grasslands and occur on tropical ferruginous soils. The experimental plots were fertilized with a basal dressing of potassium chloride and triple superphosphate before testing nitrogen fertilizer at rates of 0, 60 and 120 kg/ha N, respectively. The highest biomass was produced with 120 kg/ha (4.98, 2.13 and 1.1 t/ha DM for Pennisetum, Setaria and Tephrosia, respectively). The highest number of pods per plant with Tephrosia was produced with the control plot (35.75 pods per plant) and the lowest with an N rate of 60 kg/ha (23.75 pods per plant). The highest tussock diameters for Setaria and Pennisetum were 76.4 and 71.9 cm, respectively, at an N rate of 120 kg/ha. These 3 native forage species showed good performance under cultivation.
Keywords
Grass, Legume, Nitrogen Fertilizer, Savanna, Benin
To cite this article
KINDOMIHOU Missiakô Valentin, SAIDOU Aliou, SINSIN Brice Augustin, Response to Fertilizer of Native Grasses (Pennisetum polystachion and Setaria Sphacelata) and Legume (Tephrosia pedicellata) of Savannah in Sudanian Benin, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2014, pp. 142-146. doi: 10.11648/j.aff.20140303.11
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