Prevalence and Associated Factors of Acute Malnutrition Among 6-59 Month Children in Adi-Harush and Hitsats Refugee Camps in Tigray Region Northern Ethiopia, 2017
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 6, Issue 5, October 2018, Pages: 57-64
Received: Nov. 2, 2018; Accepted: Dec. 4, 2018; Published: Jan. 16, 2019
Views 39      Downloads 9
Authors
Hagos Brhane, Ayder Health Center, Mekele, Ethiopia
Bekri Mohammed, Department of Human Nutrition, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
Hedja Yenus Yeshita, Department of Reproductive Health, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
Kedir Abdela Gonete, Department of Human Nutrition, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Background: Wasting is characterized by low weight for height and it is common in developing countries. Wasted children have lower resistance to infection, impaired learning ability and reduce economic productivity. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of acute malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months in Adi-harush and Hitsats Eritrean refugee camps. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March 1 to April 15/2017, at Adi-Harush and Hitsats Refugee Camps. A total of 471 subjects were selected using the multi-stage sampling technique and Pre-tested and structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to identify factors associated with acute malnutrition. Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) with the corresponding 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was used to show the strength of associations and variables with p-values of <0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results: The finding of this study revealed that 37%, 21.6% and 11% of children were stunted, underweight and wasted respectively. Child age 48-57 months (AOR= 0.12, 95%CI: 0.03-0.39), frequency of feeding less than 3 times a day (AOR= 1.95, 95%CI: 1.001-3.8) and not exclusive breast feeding (AOR= 2.51, 95%CI: 1.17-5.40) were significantly associated with wasting. Conclusion: The prevalence of wasting (11%) in the study area is very high. Frequency of feeding, exclusive breast-feeding and child age were significantly associated with wasting. Improve community health education for pregnant and lactating mothers and giving exclusive breast feeding for the children’s are one of the prevention mechanisms for child wasting.
Keywords
Acute Malnutrition, Ethiopia, Under Five Children, Adi-harush and Hitsats
To cite this article
Hagos Brhane, Bekri Mohammed, Hedja Yenus Yeshita, Kedir Abdela Gonete, Prevalence and Associated Factors of Acute Malnutrition Among 6-59 Month Children in Adi-Harush and Hitsats Refugee Camps in Tigray Region Northern Ethiopia, 2017, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2018, pp. 57-64. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20180605.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
Black, R. E., et al., Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposure and health consequences. Lancet, 2008. www.thelancet.com.
[2]
Jones, G., et al., How many child deaths can we prevent this year? Lancet, 2003. 362: p. 65-71.
[3]
report, G.n.c., Acute malnutrition in everyday emergency under five children 2014.
[4]
IASC, USAID, the Harmonised Training Package (HTP): Resource Material for Training on Nutrition in Emergencies, Version 2 (2011).
[5]
Habtom Kelati, et al., Prevalence of Acute Malnutrition and its Associated Factors among Children aged 6-59 months in Mai-Aini Eritrean Refugees’ Camp, Northern Ethiopia. Nutrition and Food Sciences, 2014. 5 (1).
[6]
Shash, H. A., The Nutritional Status of Populations in Refugee/Internally Displaced Camps that Include Refugees from the Same National Origin as Refugees in DeKalb County, GA. 2011, Emory University.
[7]
UNICEF (2011) The global average rate of children under five years of age who are underweight was 16%.
[8]
EDHS (2016) Demographic and Health Survey, Preliminary Report. Ethiopia. Available ICF Macro Calverton, Maryland, USA.
[9]
World Health Organization (2000) Turning the tides of Malnutrition; Responding to the Challenges of 21st Century. CH-1211, WHO, Geneva.
[10]
B. Holaday, S. David, and M. L. Lobo, “Childhood diarrhea andmalnutrition in Pakistan, part I: incidence and prevalence,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 131–137, 1995.
[11]
G. Pechlaner and G. Otero, “The neoliberal food regime: neoregulation and the new division of labor in North America,” Rural Sociology, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 179–208, 2010.
[12]
R. E. Black, L. H. Allen, Z. A. Bhutta et al., “Maternal and child undernutrition: global and regional exposures and health consequences,”TheLancet, vol. 371, no. 9608, pp. 243–260, 2008.
[13]
C. G. Victora, L. Adair, C. Fall et al., “Maternal and child undernutrition: consequences for adult health and human capital,” The Lancet, vol. 371, no. 9609, pp. 340–357, 2008.
[14]
J. Currie and D. Almond, “Human capital development before age five,” Handbook of Labor Economics, vol. 4, pp. 1315–1486, 2011.
[15]
R. Martorell, P. Melgar, J. A. Maluccio, A. D. Stein, and J. A. Rivera, “The nutrition intervention improved adult human capital and economic productivity,” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 2, pp. 411–414, 2010.
[16]
K. G. Dewey and K. Begum, “Long-termconsequences of stunting in early life,” Maternal and Child Nutrition, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 5–18, 2011.
[17]
S. Grantham-McGregor, Y. B. Cheung, S. Cueto, P. Glewwe, L. Richter, and B. Strupp, “Developmental potential in the first 5 years for children in developing countries,” The Lancet, vol. 369, no. 9555, pp. 60–70, 2007.
[18]
R. Martorell, B. L. Horta, L. S. Adair et al., “Weight gain in the first two years of life is an important predictor of schooling outcomes in pooled analyses from five birth cohorts from lowandmiddle-income countries,” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 140, no. 2, pp. 348–354, 2010.
[19]
Resolution WHA65.6. Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition. In: Sixty-fifth World Health Assembly Geneva, 21–26 May 2012. Resolutions and decisions, annexes. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2012: 12–13 (http://www. who.int/nutrition/topics/WHA65.6_resolution_en.pdf?ua=1, accessed 6 October 2014).
[20]
World Health Organization. Global targets 2025. To improve maternal, infant and young child nutrition (www.who.int/nutrition/topics/nutrition_globaltargets2025/en/, accessed 6 October 2014).
[21]
EDHS (2011) Demographic and Health Survey, Preliminary Report. Ethiopia. Available ICF Macro Calverton, Maryland, USA.
[22]
Fentahun, W., M. Wubshet, and A. Tariku, Undernutrition and associated factors among children aged 6-59 months in East Belesa District, northwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study. BMC public health, 2016. 16 (1): p. 506.
[23]
International Organization for Migration, nutrition surveillance report issue no. 2, January–December 2011.
[24]
Alemu Adeba1, Dr. Sileshi Garoma2, Habtamu Fekadu, Wondu Garoma2 Prevalence of Wasting and Its Associated Factors of Children among 6-59 Months Age in Guto Gida District, Oromia Regional state, Ethiopia. Vol 24, 2014.
[25]
USID, Unicef, WORLD BANK the Global Fund and Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia demographic and health survey 2016.
[26]
Solomon Demissie, Amare Worku Magnitude and factors associated with malnutrition in children 6-59 months of age in pastoral community of Dollo Ado district, Somali region, Ethiopia, 2013.
[27]
Abdibari Ma’alin1, Dereje Birhanu2, Samuel Melaku3, Daniel Tolossa4*, Yusuf Mohammed5 and Kiros Gebremicheal1 Magnitude and factors associated with malnutrition in children 6–59 months of age in Shinille Woreda, Ethiopian Somali regional state: a cross-sectional study, 2016.
[28]
Wagaye Fentahun1, Mamo Wubshet2 and Amare Tariku Undernutrition and associated factors among children aged 6-59 months in East Belesa District, northwest Ethiopia, 2016.
[29]
Habtom Kelati, Bezatu Mengiste, Tadesse Alemayehu and Bereket Damtew prevalence of acute malnutrition and its associated factors among children aged 6-59 months in Mai-aini Eritrean refugees’ camp, Northern Ethiopia published November 17, 2014.
[30]
United Nations Children’s Fund, draft country program document Eritrea 21 June 2016.
[31]
Mary Abwola Olwedo1, Edison Mworozi1, Hanifa Bachou1, Christopher Garimoi Orach2 factors associated with malnutrition among children in internally displaced person’s camps, Northern Uganda African health sciences vol 8 no 4 December 2008.
[32]
Chataut J, Khanal K Assessment of Nutritional Status of Children under Five years of age in rural Nepal vol. 14, 2016.
[33]
John G. Safari, Zacharia S. Masanyiwa and 1 James E. Lwelamira Prevalence and Factors Associated with Child Malnutrition in Nzega District, Rural Tanzania, 2015.
[34]
Elham Kavosi, Zahra Hassanzadeh Rostami, Zahra Kavosi, Aliasghar Nasihatkon, Mohsen Moghadami, Mohammadreza Heidari Prevalence and determinants of under-nutrition among children under six: a cross-sectional survey in Fars province, Iran, 2014.
[35]
Solomon Demissie, Amare Worku Magnitude and factors associated with malnutrition in children 6-59 months of age in pastoral community of Dollo Ado district, Somali region, Ethiopia, 2013.
[36]
Alemu Adeba, Dr. Sileshi Garoma, Habtamu Fekadu, Wondu Garoma Prevalence of Wasting and Its Associated Factors of Children among 6-59 Months Age in Guto Gida District, Oromia Regional state, Ethiopia. Vol 24, 2014.
[37]
Habtom Kelati, Bezatu Mengiste, Tadesse Alemayehu and Bereket Damtew prevalence of acute malnutrition and its associated factors among children aged 6-59 months in Mai-aini Eritrean refugees’ camp, Northern Ethiopia published November 17, 2014.
[38]
Unicef-WHO-the World Bank Joint child malnutrition estimates, levels & trends in child malnutrition 2012.
[39]
WFP, UNHCR Report on Nutrition Survey and Anemia Intervention Impact Analysis May, 2013.
[40]
Prof. David Sanders An evaluation of the nutritional status of refugee children in Namibia 2004.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
548 FASHION AVENUE
NEW YORK, NY 10018
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-688-8931