Distribution of Earthworms at Different Habitats in Tangail, Bangladesh and Significantly Impacts on Soil pH, Organic Carbonand Nitrogen
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages: 238-246
Received: May 10, 2015; Accepted: May 26, 2015; Published: Jun. 16, 2015
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Authors
Iqbal Bahar, Department of Environmental Science and Resource Management, Mawlana Bhashani Science and Technology University, Tangail, Bangladesh
Md. Sarwar Jahan, Institute of Environmental Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
Md. Redwanur Rahman, Institute of Environmental Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Distribution of Earthworms at Different Habitats in Tangail District Significantly Impacts on Soil pH, Organic Carbon and Nitrogen. The earthworms were studied on habitat base. Two orders of class Oligochaeta of phylum Annelida: five families, nine genera include fifteen species. The recorded species are Drawida limella Gates 1934, Drawid anepalensis Michaelsen 1907, Glyphidrilus tuberosus Stephenson 1916, Amynthas alexandri Beddard 1900, Lampito mauritii Kinberg 1866, Metaphire houlleti Perrier 1872, Metaphire posthuma Vaillant 1868, Perionyx excavatus Perrier 1872, Perionyx horai Stephenson 1924, Perionyx modestus Stephenson 1922, Perionyx simlaensis Michaelsen 1907, Dichogaster modiglianii Rosa 1896, Dichogaster saliens Beddard 1893, Eutyphoeus gigas Stephenson 1917, Eutyphoeus orientalis Beddard 1883. The Highest number (11) of species was observed in water body adjacent habitat. The lowest number (03) of species was observed in steep habitat. The highest number (10) of species was observed in Gopalpur and Bhuapur upazila and the lowest number (04) of species was observed in Madhupur upazila. The studied parameters of soil were pH, organic carbon (OC) and nitrogen (N).The pH value of soil in the study area was slightly acidic but very close to the neutral status. Organic carbon status of the soil favors the distribution and abundance of earthworm that influence the soil nutrients and fertility. Nitrogen status was recorded under low level marked (0.075 %) in eleven (11) upazila out of twelve (12). The scenario of the soil nutrients OC and N are not up to the mark in the study area. Positive correlation was found between pH value of soil and earthworm species distribution in different habitats. Organic carbon is positively correlated with earthworm distribution. Nitrogen is positively correlated with organic carbon. These correlations establish that soil fertility is an integrated task where the participation of earthworm plays positive role.
Keywords
Earthworm, Habitats, Soil pH, Organic Carbon, Nitrogen, Bangladesh
To cite this article
Iqbal Bahar, Md. Sarwar Jahan, Md. Redwanur Rahman, Distribution of Earthworms at Different Habitats in Tangail, Bangladesh and Significantly Impacts on Soil pH, Organic Carbonand Nitrogen, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 238-246. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20150303.26
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