Effect of Natural and Artificial Ascorbic Acid Supplementation on the Growth Performance and Packed Cell Volume of Broiler Chicks
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2015, Pages: 158-161
Received: Mar. 24, 2015; Accepted: May 4, 2015; Published: May 12, 2015
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Authors
Ufele Angela Nwogor, Zoology Department, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria
Okoye Chidiebere Bridget, Zoology Department, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria
Ebenebe Cordelia Ifeyinwa, Zoology Department, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria
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Abstract
This research studied the effect of natural and artificial ascorbic acid supplementation on the growth performance and packed cell volume of broiler chicks. The experimental animals used were sixty (60) broiler chicks of three weeks old. Five broiler chicks were randomly assigned to each cage and there were four cages representing four different treatments. Cage A served as control where only water was given to the broiler chicks as treatment 1. Cage B contained chicks given 300mg natural ascorbic acid per liter of water as treatment 2. Cage C contained chicks given a mixture of 150mg natural and 150mg artificial ascorbic acid per liter of water as treatment 3 while cage D contained chicks given 300mg artificial ascorbic acid per liter of water. The birds were given the respective treatments for five weeks and the experiment was replicated three times. At the end of the experiment it was observed that broilers fed with natural ascorbic acid had the highest weight gain (1.22kg), followed by birds fed with natural and artificial ascorbic acid (1.09kg). Broilers fed with artificial ascorbic acid recorded a weight gain of (0.89kg) while the control group has the least weight gain of (0.79kg). Again broilers fed with natural and artificial ascorbic acid recorded the highest PCV gain (21.23%), followed by broilers fed with artificial ascorbic acid (18.1%). Broilers on the control diet recorded a PCV gain of (12.84%) while broilers fed with natural ascorbic acid recorded the least PCV gain of (9.93%). From the result of the experiment, it was observed that natural ascorbic acid enhanced growth of the broiler chicks while combination of both natural and artificial ascorbic acid boost the PCV of the broiler chicks.
Keywords
Broiler Chicks, Natural and Artificial Ascorbic Acid
To cite this article
Ufele Angela Nwogor, Okoye Chidiebere Bridget, Ebenebe Cordelia Ifeyinwa, Effect of Natural and Artificial Ascorbic Acid Supplementation on the Growth Performance and Packed Cell Volume of Broiler Chicks, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 158-161. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20150303.15
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