Wearing High Heel Shoes During Gait: Kinematics Impact and Determination of Comfort Height
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 3, Issue 2, April 2015, Pages: 56-61
Received: Jan. 17, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 9, 2015; Published: Feb. 15, 2015
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Authors
Koussihouèdé Fifamè Eudia Nadège, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Falola Jean-Marie, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin; Laboratory Human Motricity, Education, Sport, Health (LAMHESS) Training Unit and Research in Sciences and Techniques of Physical and Sports Activities (STAPS) University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France
Lawani Mohamed Mansourou, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
Gouthon Polycarpe, Laboratory APS and Motricity (LABAPSM), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey (UAC), Porto-Novo Benin
Avossevou Yves Gabriel, Research Unit Theoretical Physics (URPT) Institute of Mathematics and Physical Sciences (IMSP) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo Benin
Lawani Sophia, Laboratory of Biomechanics and Performance (LABIOP), National Institute of Youth, Physical Education and Sport (INJEPS) University of Abomey Calavi (UAC), Porto-Novo, Benin
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Abstract
Real attribute of femininity, wearing high-heeled shoes is a dress conduct of women in daily and professional tasks. Objectives. Consider the kinematics changes induced by walking heels and determine a height of comfort in the least intrusive possible locomotor pattern. Materials and methods. Fifteen young women had normal-weighted were walked with shoes without heel and with eight-heeled shoes, successive heights ranging from 2 to 9 cm in freely chosen speed without heel shoes, with three step frequencies: ±20% Ffcwh (frequency step freely chosen to heel without shoes) and 0% Ffcwh. Results. The locomotor pattern was more affected by wearing heels at ±20% of frequency selected freely chosen in shoe without heel than 0%. The height of the comfort of the shoe heel in the step is 4.13 cm ± 0.34.
Keywords
Gait, Kinematics Parameters, High Heels, Comfort Height
To cite this article
Koussihouèdé Fifamè Eudia Nadège, Falola Jean-Marie, Lawani Mohamed Mansourou, Gouthon Polycarpe, Avossevou Yves Gabriel, Lawani Sophia, Wearing High Heel Shoes During Gait: Kinematics Impact and Determination of Comfort Height, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2015, pp. 56-61. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20150302.11
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