In Vitro Inhibitory Activity of Achyranthes aspera L. Seed against Some Test Bacteria
American Journal of Life Sciences
Volume 1, Issue 3, June 2013, Pages: 113-116
Received: May 16, 2013; Published: Jun. 20, 2013
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Authors
Dash B. K., Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003, Bangladesh
Sen M. K., Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003, Bangladesh
Alam M. K., Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia-7003, Bangladesh
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Abstract
The inhibitory activity of seed extracts of Achyranthes aspera, a widely used folk medicinal plant in Bangladesh, was examined using methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum sprit as solvents against five test bacteria by disc diffusion method. Methanol extract was found to reveal significant inhibitory activity against the pathogenic B. subtilis, E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Only the methanol and ethyl acetate extracts were effective against all bacteria and the best activity was found against B. subtilis in terms of zone of clearance. The best minimum inhibitory concentration value was found by methanol extract against B. subtilis. The present study suggests that the methanol extract of seed of this plant could be a possible source of obtaining new and effective herbal medicines to treat infections; hence, it justified the ethnic use.
Keywords
Achyranthes Aspera, Inhibitory Activity, Medicinal Plant
To cite this article
Dash B. K., Sen M. K., Alam M. K., In Vitro Inhibitory Activity of Achyranthes aspera L. Seed against Some Test Bacteria, American Journal of Life Sciences. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2013, pp. 113-116. doi: 10.11648/j.ajls.20130103.16
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