Age-Dependent Impairment of Heart Muscle Contractility as a Primary Mechanism for Overexpression of Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger in Brain Cortex Tissues
European Journal of Biophysics
Volume 7, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages: 27-42
Received: Jul. 19, 2019; Accepted: Aug. 15, 2019; Published: Aug. 29, 2019
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Authors
Lilia Narinyan, Life Sciences International Postgraduate Educational Center, Unesco Chair in Life Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia
Sinerik Ayrapetyan, Life Sciences International Postgraduate Educational Center, Unesco Chair in Life Sciences, Yerevan, Armenia
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Abstract
The cognitive function of brain and contractility of heart muscle are accompanied with age-dependent dehydration of tissues of these two organs. The aim of the present study is to reveal which of the abovementioned two organs primarily fail as a result of dysfunction of age-sensitive metabolic mechanism. For this purpose, the age-dependent sensitivity of cell hydration in brain cortex and heart muscle tissues are studied through depressing metabolic activity by cooling and its activation by supplying animals with distilled water, by inactivation of Na+/K+ pump and activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange in the reverse mode. The obtained data bring us to the conclusion that the metabolic regulation of brain cortex and heart muscle tissues has different nature. The age-dependent dysfunction of Na+/K+ pump–induced activation of RNa+/Ca2+ exchange leads to dysfunction of heart muscle contractility because of activation of Ca-calmoduline-NO-cGMP production, which brings to FNa+/Ca2+ exchange induced muscle relaxation and it could serve as a primary mechanism for dysfunction of brain tissues’ metabolic control of cell hydration, which leads to overexpression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in the membrane.
Keywords
Hydration, Brain Cortex, Heart Muscle, [3H]-Ouabain, Na+/K+ Pump
To cite this article
Lilia Narinyan, Sinerik Ayrapetyan, Age-Dependent Impairment of Heart Muscle Contractility as a Primary Mechanism for Overexpression of Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger in Brain Cortex Tissues, European Journal of Biophysics. Vol. 7, No. 2, 2019, pp. 27-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ejb.20190702.11
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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